Catharine Waugh McCulloch

Catharine Waugh McCulloch

A transplant to Evanston, Catharine Waugh McCulloch adopted the city as her home and worked hard to further the push for women's suffrage in the State of Illinois and throughout the country. Her chosen profession in law allowed her the unique opportunity to fight for women's rights through the legal system; she was recognized for her skill as a lawyer on the state and local level various times. McCulloch's talents as a writer also convinced her readers to support women's suffrage. Through her arguments in the courtroom and on the printed page, McCulloch significantly contributed to the women's suffrage movement both in Illinois and throughout the United States. 

  • b. 1862 (New York), d. 1945 (Evanston)
  • moved to Evanston in 1890
  • 4 children
  • Admitted to the Bar of the Supreme Court of Illinois (1886) and the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States (1898)
  • Established the law practice McCulloch & McCulloch in Chicago with husband Frank
  • 2-time chair of the Legislative Committee of the Illinois Equal Suffrage Association
  • Wrote the bill that became the 1913 law giving Illinois women partial suffrage
Catharine Waugh McCulloch